Vaccinations in Australia

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A good travel organisation also includes having you examined by a doctor before your trip. Indeed, before leaving your hometown, it is highly recommended visiting your doctor to ensure your good health. This will help you avoid possible health risks in Australia and make the most of your adventure. When travelling overseas, you must make sure you’ve had the right vaccinations first. We tell you more in this article.

Vaccinate in time

Vaccinations are an important topic. Once you know you are going to Australia, visit your General Practitioner. He will give you recommendations for vaccination and check if you need to renew some.  It is important to do this as soon as possible, as some vaccines take some time to develop their protective effect or can be incompatible between them.

Other vaccinations require several injections, some of which can only be administered at intervals of several months. If you require a hepatitis vaccine you will get the first injection immediately, another, one month later and the last, six months later. Only then can the vaccine be fully effective. In addition, you may need to refresh a relatively large number of vaccinations. You should start to vaccinate at least six months before your departure.

Which vaccines do you need for Australia?

Luckily, Australia is a very low risk country. There are very few diseases that you could snag here, and it’s hard to catch them. However, if you intend to make a stopover for several days or weeks on your way or return flight. You should do your research first. South America and Central Africa still have yellow fewer risks.

Even if there are no prescribed vaccines for Australia, you should still have all standard vaccinations refreshed. These are vaccines that you usually have received as a child anyway, however, if you haven’t, you should get them before you visit Australia. The country has mainly exterminated these diseases from its people, so don’t bring it back!

The standard vaccinations are:

– Tetanus

– Diphtheria (upper respiratory tract infection)

– Pertussis (whooping cough)

– Polio (polio)

– Mumps

– Measles

– Rubella

– Influenza (flu)

– Pneumococci (serious infectious disease)

– Hepatitis A (infectious jaundice)

– Hepatitis B (highly infectious liver inflammation)

In addition, it is recommend to have the following vaccinations:

Tick-borne encephalitis if you plan to go to Northern Australia or to rural areas.
Rabies, which occurs in rural areas.

These vaccinations in Australia are recommended because backpackers usually travel under very simple conditions. In addition, many backpackers decide to do a trip to Indonesia. Bali, where rabies still present, is only a short flight away from Australia. 

 

The international certificate of vaccination

If you do not have a vaccination certificate or have lost yours, you will receive the international vaccination certificate (Yellow Booklet) at every health office. Your vaccination record will include all previously received vaccinations and their dates. This booklet will allow you to keep up to date with your vaccinations and be sure you are not missing any injections in the future, no matter where you are.

Some countries require proof of vaccination against specific diseases as a condition of entry. When entering certain countries, such as Africa or South America ones, an international vaccination certificate is mandatory. Your certificate should be multilingual.

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