The most dangerous spiders in Australia

0
408

Australia is the continent of the most dangerous animals in the world. Especially spiders in Australia can be really dangerous – even lethal. And they are waiting for you around every single corner! Can you tell whether they can kill you or not? Make the quiz and find out if you’re a spider expert!.

Make the quiz and find out which spiders are dangerous

Have a look at the pictures and guess in which of the following category those spiders in Australia belong. 

  • Category A: Spider is deadly & dangerous
  • Category B: Spider is toxic. That means poisonous. Its bites is very painful.
  • Category C: Spider is a “low risk” spider. Spider can be beneficial in the control of flies & mosquitos…

Just click on the question to get the solution and more information about our (sometimes not so) little friends…and by the way…body size means body size – not total size including legs.

Wolf Spider

Can this lovely spider with its beautiful pattern really kill you? What do you think? Click here to find out
Category B: This spider’s bite is poisonous but not lethal! The bite can be really painful.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, it’s a ground dweller – commonly found around the home, in garden areas Size: 15 mm to 30 mm body length
What to do once you got bitten:
First aid and medical attention (especially for children or elderly)
wolfspider150

Huntsman Spider

What about this big buddy? Lethal or not?
Category C: The bite of a Huntsman spider is not toxic to humans and they are non-aggressive although quite scary when you see them cause they’re huge!
Where to find:
Australia-wide they live under the flaking bark of trees, under flat rocks or within roof spaces. The spider wanders into homes and are found on walls.
Size:
Their body can reach up to 45 mm (that means without legs!).

.

huntsmanani

Female & Male Funnel-Web

What about those creepy creature? Dangerous or not?
Category A: Watch out! This spider can kill you! The Female Funnel-Web is one of the world’s most deadly spiders!
Where to find:
In New South Wales and Victoria, they enter homes and can be found in footwear, clothing, washing or swimming pools. They can even survive for days under water!
Size:
Male: 25, Female: 30 mm
What to do once you got bitten:
Go to the next hospital or call an ambulance immediately. They have an anti-venom!
The Blue Mountains Funnel-Web spiders and the Northern Tree Funnel-Web spiders are also high venomous.
funnelwebfemale128
funnelwebmaleani

Saint Andrew’s Cross

What do you think about this elegant spider? Is it lethal?
Category C: This spider can’t harm you cause it belongs to the low risk spiders and is non-aggressive.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, found in summer in gardens around the house
Size:
5-15 mm in body length
standrewsspider128

White-Tail Spider

What about this one? Can you guess whether it’s dangerous or not?
Category A: This spider can be dangerous. In some rare cases they can cause severe allergic reactions. However, it’s not proven yet…
Where to find:
Australia-wide, prefers cool moist places like in garden mulch areas. In summer they wander into buildings to escape the heat!
Size:
Adults between 12 and 20 mm in body length!
What to do once you got bitten:
First aid and medical attention
whitetailspider127

.

Female & Male Mouse Spider

Those spiders look so dangerous...but are they?
Category B: Those creepy spiders can cause severe illness especially to young children. The mail spider’s bite can be really painful.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, they are ground dwellers with burrows of more than 1 metre deep. The male spider wanders around during the day.
Size:
Up to 35 mm in body length
What to do once you got bitten:
First aid and medical attention
mousespiderfemale150
malemousespider127

Garden Orb-Weaving

This thing looks kind of like a crab. Harmless or not?
Category C: This spider is harmless. It’s non-aggressive and its bite is non toxic to humans.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, more common in bush land along the eastern coastal areas, often found in summer in the garden around home.
Size:
20-30 mm
gardenorbweaving150

Black House Spider

Looks really creepy! But can it really kill you?
Category B: This spider’s bite is poisonous but not lethal! The bite itself can be really painful.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, commonly found in window framing, under eaves, in brickwork, toilets and among rocks and bark.
Size:
Adults are about 15mm in length.
What to do once you got bitten:
First aid and medical attention.
blackhousespider150

Female Trap-Door

Looks like it has 10 legs!? Argh…but really dangerous?
Category C: This spider looks more dangerous than it is. It’s non-aggressive and its bite is non toxic to humans.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, it’s a ground dweller. Commonly found in drier open ground areas around the home
Size:
Adult is about 35 mm in body length

..

trapdoorfemale150

Red-Back Spider

Its back looks almost like a tiny red heart. Does this spider really loves you?
Category A: This spider can be deadly! Its poison is highly venomous! The bite is very painful and a small amount of venom can cause serious illness (attacks the nervous system. By the way…they do not always have a red marking.
Where to find:
Australia-wide, prefers dry habitats (out-houses, letter boxes, under seats, in rubbish…)
Size:
Varies, males can be tiny, female’s abdomen can grow to the size of a large pea.
What to do once you got bitten:
Go to the next hospital or call an ambulance immediately. They have an anti-venom!
redbackspider77

Congratulation, you just finished the spider quiz! We hope that no matter if you’re an expert or not you won’t come across too many spiders in Australia!

To improve your spider knowledge here’s a nice overview:

spider-chart980
alluneedpestcontrol.com.au/spiderchart/

Source & Pictures: spiders.com.au

Updated in 2019.